Are You Keeping In Contact With People Via Facebook Messenger? You May Want To Read The Terms Of Service

Facebook_messenger_logoNo matter how business oriented we may be, we can all stand to take a little time to chat it up with friends on Facebook right? I mean it is 2014 after all. Just about everyone and their mother has a Facebook. This is just the way that social media has brought society. It can sometimes make things convenient, but it has also made us very lazy. How so you may ask? Think about it. How many of you have actually read the “Terms of Service” for anything that you use? I know I never do. Because of this laziness, it has led us to be susceptible to some things that Facebook hasn’t told us “up front”.

Time For A Split

In case you are unaware, the Facebook Messenger App and the Facebook app might be going their separate ways. Not to say that they won’t still be part of the same unit, but as apps, they will be two separate entities. Eventually, the Facebook app won’t have a messaging feature. In order to completely Facebook from your mobile device, messaging included, you’re going to HAVE to download the Messenger app in order to stay connected the way that you want to. Recently there have been a few changes with the updates to the apps themselves, but there are a few things that people should be more aware of. The Messenger app isn’t exactly as safe as you may think. You probably thought that it was just another way to stay in contact with friend, business colleagues, and family. Well it might be a bit more complicated than you’d think.

186009294We Should Have Read The Terms Of Service

The Terms of Service for any program might as well just be part of a webpage or program’s overall look and design nowadays. No one reads them, and with due cause. It takes much longer to read through all of the Terms of Service, Privacy Policies, and User License Agreements than you may think. Because of this, we choose to not read through these rules. They give us all the information that we need to know though. The answer is yes, the Messenger app does terms that allow for it to access your microphone, call log, camera, and text messages. It seems “malicious”, and it a way it could be. But take a minute to think about the apps that you’re using. They’re free right? Well “free”… The advertisements pay for these apps. They don’t want to pay for dead advertising though. This is why these apps, such as the messenger app, are allowed to ask for/gather your location information and account information. This way the advertisers can target audiences to market to. That and the fact that the messenger app allows for calls and sending messages with images or videos, which requires the use and access of your camera and microphone. So they could be malicious, but many of the apps we use that involve advertisements have access to the same things.

So What Are You Going To Do?

I would highly recommend doing what you feel would be best. If you’re not too worried about having an application have access to your call log and text messages, then you should be fine with keeping it. After all, the Messenger app is still part of Facebook, which means that the Facebook app’s terms of service have roughly the same types of accesses. Again, we tend to not look through all of the terms of service, user agreements, and blah blah blah. There is usually too much there to read, and it’s written in a way that protects the company’s livelihood. Lots of legal jargon. Most of of us, even if we did read it, wouldn’t understand a lot of it. So we all must make a decision on our own regarding whether or not we want to just accept certain privacies being invaded, which could just give allowance to the people who write these terms to keep going. That, or we can choose to not use the apps at all, or read and make the judgement calls for ourselves. Just be ready to eat up a bunch of your time should you choose to go the latter route.

Facebook has changed a lot from what we have seen over the years. it’s continuously developed in order to adapt with the times. No one expected the mobile versions to have these specifications within their terms of service. That is how business must be conducted for the advertisers working in conjunction with our apps to make them free though I suppose. I guess we should all pay a little more attention to what we agree to from now on before we get mad or make a decision to use an app.

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